• Hannah Bangel

Are You Ready to Run Postpartum?



Breaking down our Return to Run screening process!


Recent research from the 2019 UK Postpartum Return to Run Guidelines suggest that waiting until 12 weeks postpartum AND meeting criteria for the return to run readiness screen may be the most beneficial recommendation when returning to run postpartum.


Running is a series of single leg bounds that results in a sudden increase in intra-abdominal pressure and ground reaction forces that double our bodyweight. This places a lot of demand on the pelvic floor and the muscles that surround it, like your glutes and hamstrings. We can assess the strength and coordination of these muscles with a series of movements and it can give us an idea of areas we may need to focus on.


We actually do a screening process in the office that helps us get a better understanding of how your body responds to impact and a general idea of your functional strength.


Put yourself to the test!


Return to Run Screen:


Can you complete the following without symptoms (leaking, heaviness, pressure, pain), for the full duration and with the proper technique as described below?


Wall Sit for 1 min

  • Sit with your back against a wall

  • Try to keep a 90-degree bend in your knees and your hips

  • Hold for 1 min or until you start to feel symptoms

Single Leg Heel Raise 20 reps each side

  • Stand on one leg and raise your heel off the ground as high as you can

  • Repeat on one side for 20 reps, then switch sides

  • Stop if you feel symptoms or get fatigued and can’t lift your heel

Single Leg Bridge 10 reps each side

  • Lie on your back and bring one knee into your chest while keeping the opposite foot on the ground

  • Lift your hips off the ground using one leg

  • Repeat on one side for 10 reps, then switch sides

  • Stop if you feel symptoms or cannot lift your hips as high as previous reps

Single Leg Squat 10 reps each side

  • Stand on one leg and bend your knee as you sit your hips down

  • Repeat on one side for 10 reps, then switch sides

  • Stop if you feel symptoms or cannot keep hips level

Plank for 1 min

  • Perform plank on hands or elbows

Side plank 30 sec each side

  • Perform side plank on hand or elbow with knees lifted off the ground

Double Leg Hopping 1 min

  • Stop if you have any amount of leaking or feeling like you’re going to leak

Single Leg Hopping 10 reps each side

  • Stop if you have any amount of leaking or feeling like you’re going to leak

Forward Bounds 10 reps each side

  • Start standing on one leg, leap forward landing on the opposite leg

  • Maintain your balance as you continue to bound forward landing on one leg



If you could not complete a movement for the prescribed duration or reps, that does not mean you cannot run. This just means we have some work to do!


A full pelvic floor and whole body assessment is always recommended to give us more information on what may be going on and why. If you tried these tests and had any that you didn’t “pass” , give us a call and we can help you figure out what might be going on so you can feel your best during your runs!


If you have questions about a specific situation, please get in touch! We are always happy to chat!

Send us a DM on IG @4thtrimester.chs or email: Meg@4thtrimesterchs.com.








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